How To Get Around Web 2.0 Censorship

Is YouTube censored in your country? Having trouble getting onto Flickr to post your photos? MohammedR, an Iranian developer tired of not being able to access social networking websites in his country, came up with “FreeAccess Plus!”, which bloggers say is “making miracles” happen in Iran. [From How To Get Around Web 2.0 Censorship]

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sometimes the internet can route around censorship… then they cut the wires…

The Cape Town Open Education Declaration

The Cape Town Open Education Declaration:
Cape Town Open Education Declaration:
Unlocking the promise of open educational resources
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I think most people should support open education, if not in this form, then in some reasonable form that admits that knowledge cannot be owned, though it is frequently proprietized into a commodity, that commodity-form, i argue, is not knowledge anymore, it is an object, whereas knowledge only exists inside subjects, which is something objects tend not to do.

edu-Impact | college & university economic impact portal

edu-Impact | college & university economic impact portal:
Welcome to edu-Impact, the College & University Economic Impact Portal.
Appleseed, a New York City-based consulting firm, created this portal in response to a growing interest in the regional economic and community development impacts of colleges and universities. This portal is the most comprehensive source of information on the subject.

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this is a handy site for economic impact studies related to universities.

Girls and science: a training module on motivating girls to embark on science and technology careers: SCIENCE (3.01b)

Girls and science: a training module on motivating girls to embark on science and technology careers: SCIENCE (3.01b) :
With women accounting for more than 50% of the world population, achieving gender parity is an issue of global concern. The under-representation and under-achievement of girls in science and technology subjects can be seen as a serious inefficiency in educational systems in countries whose development depends crucially on the generation of human technological capacity.

this training module might be useful in a variety of ways

Gender Indicators in Science, Engineering and Technology: SCIENCE (3.01b)

Gender Indicators in Science, Engineering and Technology: SCIENCE (3.01b) :
Just out: the UNESCO toolkit on Gender Indicators in Science, Engineering and Technology provides a better understanding of the numbers and needs at stake in these fields, including quantitative and qualitative indicators for the participation of women and under-represented groups, especially in developing countries.

handy

Women's participation in research

Women’s participation in research:
Read Head counts and headaches measuring women in science,which summarizes a survey by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics of women’s participation in research in 86 countries (A World of Science, April 2007, pages 21-23).

Read also the editorial on The Glass Ceiling by UNESCO’s Assistant Director-General for Natural Sciences (A World of Science, April 2007).

this is another situation that needs to be resolve. equality in science.

Public access group challenges Smithsonian over copyrights

Public access group challenges Smithsonian over copyrights:
Grabbing pictures of iconic Smithsonian Institution artifacts just got a whole lot easier.

Before, if you wanted to get a picture of the Wright Brothers’ plane, you could go to the Smithsonian Images Web site and pay for a print or high-resolution image after clicking through several warnings about copyrights and other restrictions — and only if you were a student, teacher or someone pledging not to use it to make money.

Now, you can just go to the free photo-sharing Web site flickr.com.

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Carl Malamud and his group are doing some good work on freeing and sustaining the freedom of access to public resources

Spy Chips

Spy Chips:
This book will make you look at every store-bought item you own or debate owning with a curious skepticism that — after reading the book — won’t seem too unwarranted. It was published two years ago (a cheap paperback came out in the fall), but if you’ve yet to explore the fascinating, potentially paranoia-inducing, world of RFID and you want the cautionary, consumer-advocate perspective about the Radio Frequency Identification tracking being proposed — and used! — by certain companies (for instance, Gillette, Procter & Gamble and Wal-Mart)

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this could be an interesting book.